Unique – Patek Philippe: World Time

Since Patek Philippe fake reintroduced its World Time watch in 2000, the cult status of this complication has reached dizzying heights, as evidenced by watch auctions over the past 20 years. But it was the enamel and cloisonné enamel dials that made it to the auction block that really made the list. why is that? What makes them so special?

To truly understand this phenomenon, it is first necessary to realize that Patek Philippe produces fewer than 1,000 World Time watches a year. Of these, only 50 to 100 have enamel dials. In addition, there are few master enamels today, and even for them the process of making the dials of these enamel models is very rigorous. Let’s take a look at a brief history of enamel and its various applications.

While the earliest decorative enamel works are found on rings found in Cypress more than 1300 years before modern times (BC), our modern techniques handcrafted by major Geneva residents date back to the late 1700s and early 1800s . The market is expanding due to increasing interest in portable timepieces.

In its purest state, enamel is a powdered glass spread over a metal surface and fired in an oven at 1,380 to 1,560°F. When it melts at extreme heat, it liquefies, flowing outward to the edges of the surface. As it cools, it hardens into a smooth and very durable coating. For each layer or color, depending on the application used, continuous firing is required. Since the glass becomes liquid, it needs bezels to prevent it from spilling over the sides of the metal substrate. The two most common techniques are Champlevé and Cloisonné. fashion replica

Champlevé is a technique in which metal is carved quite deeply to form a pool or reservoir in which the enamel can be placed, which is then fired. If the guilloche works first, the artist may want to accentuate the guilloche work and therefore use a single or thinner fire. If it’s just a deep etched engraving, the artist will usually use multiple fires, which will make the color deeper and richer, just as a car enthusiast might apply 10 clear coats of flake paint, only to put the It is polished to 5 shimmering ultra clear coats.

Cloisonne, on the other hand, took the opposite approach. It starts with a flat surface, where the artist draws the basic outlines of the design features. The artist then takes the gold or silver wire and painstakingly places it on those same contours, carefully bending the wire to match the drawing. The result is walls that form clapboards or compartments (“cloisons” in French), in which the enamel is placed before firing. This is the most important point: no two descriptions are the same. The artist has a pattern, but only when examining two or more works side-by-side do small but perceptible differences from one work to the other emerge.

Enamel dial watches reached their heights of popularity in the post-World War II period from the 1940s to the early 1960s. Dial makers such as Stern Frères and Beyeler have produced various depicting artworks for Patek Philippe, Vacheron Constantin, Rolex and Omega. However, it is important to understand that these dial companies often have to outsource this type of work to local artisans,
Only a few of them are able to provide this level of service. By the 1970s, enamel dials had all but disappeared, and the industry had all but disappeared in the wake of the “quartz crisis.”

The history of Patek Philippe World Time watches is similar to their close collaboration with Louis Cottier, who developed this complication. A separate, longer article is required to delve into this history, so I’ll save it for another time. But after the death of Louis Cottier in the late 1960s, Patek Philippe eliminated the complication entirely. Thus, in 2000, Patek Philippe launched its first World Time watch in 35 years, the 5110, with a diameter of 37 mm and a new movement, the Calibre 240 HU (Universal Time or Universal Time).

The case has an A-shaped symmetrical design, and the crown guard protrudes smoothly to the outer rim of the crown to prevent impacts. However, watch lovers who know the history of Patek Philippe enamel dial World Time watches will need to wait another 6 years before the brand relaunches one of its most coveted and cherished dial designs.

In 2006, Patek Philippe introduced the 5130, a 39.5mm case housing the now-legendary 240 HU movement. Manufactured in the same style as the 5110, albeit with slightly longer lugs, this model is an instant welcome addition to the collection as taste in men’s watches is getting closer to the 40mm mark. With its slim round bezel, the 5130 is worn visually close enough to this evolving standard to meet the needs of many customers.

With the introduction of the 5130 in 2006, Patek Philippe also expanded by adding the 5131J (gold), a cloisonné enamel dial depicting an orbital view of the Atlantic Ocean, with the Americas on the left of the dial and Europe and Africa on the right. From the moment it was released, the model sold for two to three times its retail price on the secondary market due to very low production volumes. Since almost no one has produced dials of this type since the 1960s, there are no schools offering courses to train a new generation of watchmakers and dialmakers. It was passed down by artists who were willing to take apprentices, and even Patek Philippe had to hire local Geneva artists.

The 5131J is followed by the 5131G (white gold), which depicts a view of the Asian orbit centered on India, with Africa and Europe on the left, most of Asia at 12 o’clock, and Australia and East Asia on the right of the dial. This dial was followed by 5131R (rose gold), depicting a view of the Pacific Ocean with the Americas on the right and Asia and Australia on the left. All 3 variants are available on alligator leather straps with deployment clasp. The series concludes with the release of the 5131/1P (Platinum), depicting views of the Arctic ice sheets, with Asia and Europe on the right, and Greenland and North America on the left. Since the piece is on a platinum bracelet, the watch costs twice as much as any gold piece,

In 2016, Patek Philippe decided to completely redesign the case and delved into its extensive catalog to create the 5230, at the same time releasing the extension 5231J. Patek Philippe aims to differentiate it from its siblings in a number of ways, starting with its size. Noting the growing trend of Asian customers and Europeans towards smaller dress watches, the brand decided to reduce the World Time from its 39.5mm 5130 case size to a more elegant 38.5mm size. The difference, by itself, is almost imperceptible on the wrist. But more strikingly, Patek Philippe decided to ditch the crown guard in favor of a symmetrical case design. Another detail they changed, and one that the author likes, is that the lugs can flow off the case smoothly.

The 5321J was released with the now classic Atlantic orbital view, very similar to the 5131J, but with an arguably more colorful dial. Also, as mentioned, each dial is unique to each model, and even looking at the pictures of any particular model, you’ll notice that the lay of the gold line outlines and the color of the continent is slightly different.

Indeed, to own a piece of cloisonne enamel is to own a “one-of-a-kind piece,” which is why these pieces require a large investment from the initial buyer, and why they command such a high premium on the secondary market and at auction. When we look back at the enamel dials of the 1950s and ’60s, if history is any guide, these pieces invested in today will pay for a second home 30 to 40 years later, and why “you never really owned a Patek Philippe . You Just taking care of it for the next generation.” quality replica watches in store

Zenith Pilot Type 20 Extra Special Bronze 45mm

Bronze…not a typical watch material – especially a pilot’s watch. Bronze has been used many times in watchmaking, but it makes more sense in diving watches (even though, to be honest, bronze is still an odd choice for a timepiece. We’ll discuss why later in this article). When you think of bronze, you immediately think of Panerai, but other brands use it (eg IWC and Aquatimer). Now it’s Zenith’s turn to launch a watch in this green metal. It’s a pilot watch, it’s big, but it looks really cool. This is the Zenith Pilot Type 20 Extra Special Bronze 45mm.

The Zenith Pilot Type 20 became an iconic and easily recognizable timepiece among all pilot-oriented watches. Even though it has many classic aviator-style attributes, the Type 20 (not related to the Breguet Type XX, but rather to a specific serial number of a French navy-specific instrument) has its own design, its own style, its own feel and what makes it Something special. Of course, the collection consists of large to very large pieces. You might think of the already huge Montre D’Aéronef Type 20 GMT Pilot and its 48mm case. You might also think of the huge 60mm (yes, 6cm) Zenith Pilot Type 20 with its Grand Feu enamel dial. However, keep in mind that the collection also includes a small (compared to the rest) 40mm version, Made for women or men with discreet intentions, and a medium Extra-Special model measuring 45mm, now available in a bronze case. swiss cheap watches

45mm may sound huge, but remember that a significant part of the fun a pilot’s watch provides comes from its sheer size. In the golden age of aviator instruments, a design attribute now is the need for legibility. Major cases are both respect for historical works and respect for normalcy. As such, the Zenith Pilot Type 20 Extra Special’s 45mm case has a standard feel – second only to the 46mm IWC Big Pilot or the 47mm Oris Big Crown ProPilot altimeter. The shape is the same as its larger sister, with these Specific lugs and strap accessories. Crowns are also typical of the range, with round and large onion shapes (this shape is a good point as the classic and sharp onion crowns tend to hurt). The main novelty: the material used for the case. The Zenith Pilot Type 20 Extra Special Bronze 45mm is made of… Bronze. What an odd choice for a pilot’s watch! Whatever the reason for this choice, the results are excellent. It’s warm, rough, and brings a suitably vintage vibe to an already retro-oriented watch. The case has a rough satin finish, again emphasizing the antique look.

Now you should be asking why we find bronze to be an odd choice for a watch – whatever it is, diver or not. In fact, bronze is unstable and ages quickly when exposed to water, acid, heat, or just sweating. This means that your beautiful gold Zenith Pilot Type 20 Extra Special will see its case covered in green oxide after wearing it for weeks/months. Nothing bad as it will give it a special and unique sheen, but it’s something you have to pay attention to (you can easily clean it and remove this oxide). www.moonphase-watch.com

This bronze case complements the look of the dial and hands and is very successful. Everything in the Type 20 (regardless of version) is reminiscent of (very) early pilot watches – not the 1940s/1950s ones we usually see in retro reissues, but the 1910s/1920s Those of the era (such as this one created by Zenith for Louis Bleriot in the 1910s) are evident from the large Arabic numerals (here painted with luminous material) and the shape of the typical cathedral hands. Gold hands and slightly creamy numerals contrast on the matte black dial, which complements the bronze case. The overall result is very pleasing.

Inside the Zenith Pilot Type 20 Extra Special Bronze is the in-house movement Elite 679, a nice three-hand self-winding movement (no longer a Sellita movement. It’s a good sign that Zenith cheap has launched its own movement) Known for reliability, precision and aesthetics). The movement consists of 126 components and has a power reserve of at least 50 hours. Measuring just 3.85mm in height and 25.6mm in diameter, the movement promises to be hidden behind a sturdy caseback – it would be odd to see the movement through the sapphire caseback in the 45mm case. The same applies to dates, but fortunately, that complication is not present here. Case back made of titanium (bronze can cause irritation if in direct contact with the skin),

Super Complicated IWC Watches You Might Not Buy

Meet the technology and boldness of the IWC Big Pilot Constant Force Tourbillon Edition AMG One Owners, just for the AMG One Owners…

About a week ago, Mercedes-Benz’s AMG division unveiled its most advanced, complex and powerful supercar ever. We often hear the concept of “road racing” or brands applying F1 technology to sports cars. The concept has never been rolled out to the new Mercedes-AMG One, which is powered by nearly the same engine as Lewis’ F1 car, the hybrid 1.6-liter turbo used in the 2016 Mercedes F1 W07 V6…built in the UK using the same facilities as the current MB F1 car. So, speaking of watch pairings, learn about the partnership between IWC and AMG, which watch can you offer the owner of this $2 million car? You certainly can’t just do a simple time. So you created the IWC Big Pilot’s Watch Constant-Force Tourbillon Edition AMG One Owners IW590502.

In short, this Mercedes-AMG One may be the most advanced, F1-derived road car ever made. The engine… comes straight from a real Mercedes-AMG Formula 1 car (2016 W07), using the same hybrid technology with little to no tuning down. The result is a combined power of 1,060 hp, an internal combustion engine revving at 11,000 rpm, four electric motors, Formula 1-style MGU-K and MGU-H technology, and an engine that needs to be completely refurbished after 50,000 km…if the chassis and body Completely bespoke for this car, everything is related to what is used in F1 cars. Yes, before electricity changed the game, this kind of thing was crazy, probably the last.

With these specs in mind, what kind of watch can you offer this car? As we mentioned, not even a simple custom-designed chronograph automatic watches replica can do the job. You need something unique. But you also need an engine to match. IWC has found the answer in this new watch exclusively for owners of the Mercedes-AMG ONE (275 examples will be built, which will definitely be less when it comes to watches). Inside is the Schaffhausen brand’s most advanced movement Constant Force Tourbillon.

The watch itself isn’t entirely new, as we’ve seen the design and movement in previous IWC models, such as Big Pilot’s Watch Constant-Force Tourbillon Edition IWC Racing. This movement is also used in the Portuguese Constant Force Tourbillon 150 Years Edition. This new reference IW590502 is basically the same as the IWC race car, with new materials and new colors.

The 46.2mm case is based on the classic BP design, featuring an oversized diamond-shaped crown and a large dial opening. The new product is a titanium aluminide (TiAl) material. This high-tech material is lighter, harder, corrosion-resistant and biocompatible than conventional titanium, and belongs to the group of intermetallic compounds. Due to the specific mixing ratio of titanium and aluminum, the atoms and electrons are arranged in a specific way. This allows the material to have certain non-metallic properties in addition to the classical properties of metals. In the case of TiAl, its high temperature resistance is outstanding. For this reason, the material is used in the turbine blades of modern jet engines, where light weight and temperature resistance are essential requirements. Its special properties also make it ideal for high-performance engine components in motorsport. The disadvantage is that this material is particularly difficult to process. It features a polished and sandblasted finish with a titanium screw-down crown and a Ceratanium caseback ring. A thin ring in AMG-Petronas green marks the transition between the polished and sandblasted parts of the case.

The black dial of the Big Pilot’s Watch Constant-Force Tourbillon Edition AMG One Owners IW590502 is a classic of the collection, with oversized luminous hands and application markers. It features a bi-moon for the northern and southern hemispheres, a power reserve indicator and light green AMG-Petronas accents. The highlight is, of course, the huge tourbillon regulator and its constant-force mechanism at 9 o’clock.

The in-house calibre 94800 is a rather large hand-wound engine, regulated by this special device that compensates for the two main problems of mechanical movement: the effect of gravity on the regulating mechanism and the reduced torque of the mainspring when it is unwinding . The one-minute tourbillon is enclosed in a constant-force device that separates the escapement from the direct power passing through the gear train and transmits the pulse of energy evenly to the escape wheel.

The IWC Big Pilot’s Watch Constant Force Tourbillon Edition AMG One Owners IW590502 is worn on a new integrated two-tone rubber strap using a so-called multi-component injection molding process. It is available in black and green and features the Mercedes star in Gemini green. nadal watch price

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS – IWC BIG PILOT’S WATCH CONSTANT-FORCE TOURBILLON EDITION AMG ONE OWNERS
Case: Diameter 46.2mm x H13.5mm – Titanium Aluminide (TiAl) case – Titanium screw-down crown – Ceratanium caseback with sapphire crystal – Top convex sapphire crystal with AR coating to prevent displacement due to drops in air pressure – 60m waterproof
Dial: Matte black dial – Rhodium-plated hands with SLN application markers – Light green AMG-Petronas decoration
Movement: Manufacture Caliber 94800 – Manual winding – 41 jewels – Tourbillon with integrated constant force mechanism – 18,000 vibrations/hour – 96 hours power reserve (4 days) – Hours, minutes, small tourbillon seconds, Moon phase display for northern and southern hemispheres, power reserve indicator
Strap: Integrated black and green rubber strap with pin buckle
Reference: IW590502